David McKinney/University Relations

Wendy Rohleder-Sook works to ensure a successful student experience at the School of Law from recruitment through graduations.

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Wendy Rohleder-Sook, associate dean for student affairs, School of Law

Years at current job: Three

Job duties: One of my primary responsibilities is overseeing the law school Admissions and Registrar offices. The Office of Admissions is responsible for the recruitment, admission and matriculation of new students, as well as scholarship allocation. The Registrar coordinates the enrollment process, advises students regarding academic policies and monitors degree requirements. I manage our 35 law school student organizations, and I guide the Deanís Fellows Program, which matches upper-level students with new students in a mentoring role. I work with many colleagues in the law school to coordinate various student events, like our annual hooding ceremony, diversity in law banquet and student recognition program. I help students meet their academic responsibilities by arranging accommodations for students with disabilities and providing assistance to students with physical and mental health issues.

Whatís one thing that would surprise people about your work? The number of different hats I wear in my job. I am often surprised by the wide range of issues that may come up in one day, but the variety is part of my job that I enjoy the most. It allows me to continue honing my problem-solving skills and collaborate with great colleagues in the law school, as well as across campus. I appreciate the opportunity to help students meet their goals in this stage of their professional journey. Seeing students succeed is very rewarding.

What is the importance of the student experience for law school graduates? Students develop important relationships with their fellow students, faculty and staff while in law school that extend beyond graduation. Their classmates in law school will one day become the colleagues they seek for guidance in their professional careers. The leadership opportunities they take on now will help prepare them for leadership positions within their future law firms, businesses, or organizations.

How are the concerns of a law student unique, and in what ways are they similar to that of students of other disciplines? In many ways, law students encounter the same challenges as students in other disciplines. They are concerned about their academic success, paying for school and finding employment upon graduation.

The competitive nature and academic rigor of law school can be stressful for students. We encourage our students to make time to do things they enjoy, as well as exercise and eat a healthy diet. We have approximately 500 students who spend a lot of time in Green Hall, which creates a close community. Our students, faculty and staff demonstrate a genuine concern for the well-being of every member of the community.

Additionally, many of our students have spent some time working professionally before law school, and many balance family and part-time work commitments with their academic responsibilities.

Campus closeup
Wendy Rohleder-Sook, associate dean for student affairs, School of Law
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